Saturday November 01 , 2014

NAKED WEEKEND CHILLOUT - IS IT ILLEGAL TO BE NAKED IN PUBLIC

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  1. NAKED WEEKEND CHILLOUT
  2. NAKED GAY GROUPS WE PROMOTE
  3. IS IT ILLEGAL TO BE NAKED IN PUBLIC current position

 



IS IT ILLEGAL TO BE NAKED IN PUBLIC IN THE UK



Technically, there is no law against being nude in public in the United Kingdom. Simple nudity is not illegal. However,using nudity to "harass, alarm or distress" others is an offence against the Public Order Act of 1986.


In practice, this means that if you are nude, minding your own business and practicing good nude beach etiquette on a beach that is unofficial but, by common consent, considered to be a nude beach, you are unlikely to have any problem. In England and Wales, if someone - a policeman or a member of the public - asks you to cover up, you should do so or you could be arrested. To be charged, someone would have to prove that you were deliberately trying to cause offence. But in practice, refusing to cover up when asked could cause you a great deal of inconvenience.


In more detail:

More modern authority defines a breach of the peace as existing whether harm is actually done, or is likely to be done, to a person or his property, or a person is in fear of being harmed through an assault, an affray, a riot, an unlawful assembly, or some other form of disturbance.[

The power to arrest for a breach of the Peace is usually used to remove violent, potentially violent or provocative offenders (it is not necessary for the offender himself to be physically involved in any violence) from a scene rapidly, in Bibby V Chief Constable of Essex it was also used when a person in the opinion of a Constable was likely to be the victim of a breach of the peace or an act of violence.

In England and Wales, breach of the peace is not an offence, in the sense that it is not punishable either by a fine or imprisonment either at statute or common law andnor do proceedings for breach of the peace give rise to any conviction.[6] In England and Wales, constables (or citizens) are permitted to arrest a person to "prevent a further breach of the peace" which allows for the police or the public to arrest a person before a breach of the peace has occurred. This is permitted when it is reasonable to believe should the person remain, that they would continue with their course of conduct and that a Breach of the Peace would occur.

The only immediate sanction that can be imposed by a court for breach of the peace is to bind over the offender to keep the peace: that is, justices of the peace can require a person to enter into a recognizance to keep the peace.

The binding over itself does not amount to a conviction (but any following behaviour causing loss of the surety might well result in conviction for an associated offence).
 

 

 

 

 

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