Halloween

If you are nervous of things that put the willies up you in the night - then you are going to hate Halloween.
Halloween – or Hallowe'en or All Hallow's Eve – is not new in Britain. In fact its origins appear to have come from different pagan and Christian traditions in the British Isles. Irish and Scottish immigrants first imported it over to the US in the 19th century.

So - before you assume and criticize the American take over of English traditions - like we have Bon Fire Night celebrating the horrible death of Guy Fawkes ( who was not tortured to death by being hung, drawn and quartered - as we have all been told - he actually knew of his fate and jumped over the parapet of the castle with the rope around his neck and hung himself where the rope almost took his head clean off, so dead - and yet the court and officials still went ahead and hung him, then cut him open and then tied him to 4 horses to pulled him limb from limb ) and America has always celebrated Halloween whereas it has only started to become popular here in the UK during the last 20 years, and has always been seen as an American imposter, BUT :- IT STEMS FROM BRITAIN ORIGINALLY and like so many things we think are American, this is yet another sign of a European ' something ' being hijacked by America who made it appear to be their own, when it is stolen, just like turkeys at Thanks Giving was an American Indian celebration hijacked by the early settlers and people assume it is white Americans, when it truly belongs to the Native Americans.


The word "Halloween" comes from All Hallows' Eve and means "hallowed evening." Hundreds of years ago, people dressed up as saints and went door-to-door, which is the origin of Halloween costumes and trick-or-treating


Halloween's origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago, mostly in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1st.



Halloween is associated with elaborate costumes, haunted houses and, of course, candy, but it's also linked to a number of risks, including pedestrian fatalities and theft or vandalism. Oct. 31 may be one of the most dangerous days of the year for your children, home, car and health.


The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745 and is of Christian origin. The word « Hallowe'en » means « Saints' evening ». It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day). … Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en.



In understanding whether celebrating Halloween is a sin, we have to know that it based on both pagan and Catholic traditions of connecting with the dead in hopes to gain power, in the pagan tradition, or to make intersession, in the Catholic tradition. But, this scripture makes clear that neither is possible.


What is the Bible say about Halloween? "Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour." "Abstain from every form of evil." "Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!"


Halloween, contraction of All Hallows' Eve, a holiday observed on October 31, the evening before All Saints' (or All Hallows') Day. The celebration marks the day before the Western Christian feast of All Saints and initiates the season of Allhallowtide, which lasts three days and concludes with All Souls' Day.


Why Christians shouldn't celebrate Halloween?

Halloween is a devil's holiday, not a Christian observance. The founder of the church of Satan said that by dressing up, either by wearing a costume or coloring oneself for Halloween, is tantamount to worshipping the devil.


Who does not celebrate Halloween?

Jehovah's Witnesses: They don't celebrate any holidays or even birthdays. Some Christians: Some believe the holiday is associated with Satanism or Paganism, so are against celebrating it. Orthodox Jews: They don't celebrate Halloween due to its origins as a Christian holiday. Other Jews may or may not celebrate.


Halloween is celebrated in the United States on October 31. ... People tried to appease the restless spirits on Halloween, and these practices led to many of today's Halloween traditions. For example, people used to wear costumes of monsters, ghosts, and devils to scare away the harmful spirits.


Halloween history and customs


  1. Samhain: The origin of Halloween can be traced to this “ancient pagan festival celebrated by Celtic people over 2,000 years ago,” states The World Book Encyclopedia. “The Celts believed that the dead could walk among the living at this time. During Samhain, the living could visit with the dead.” However, the Bible clearly teaches that the dead “are conscious of nothing at all.” (Ecclesiastes 9:5) Thus, they cannot contact the living.

Halloween costumes, candy, and trick or treat: According to the book Halloween​—An American Holiday, An American History, some of the Celts wore ghoulish costumes so that wandering spirits would mistake them for one of their own and leave them alone. Others offered sweets to the spirits to appease them. In medieval Europe, the Catholic clergy adopted local pagan customs and had their adherents go from house to house wearing costumes and requesting small gifts. The Bible, on the other hand, does not permit merging false religious practices with the worship of God.​—2 Corinthians 6:​17.

Ghosts, vampires, werewolves, witches, and zombies: These have long been associated with the evil spirit world. (Halloween Trivia) The Bible clearly states that we should oppose wicked spirit forces, not celebrate with them.​—Ephesians 6:​12.


Halloween pumpkins, or jack-o’-lanterns: In medieval Britain, “supplicants moved from door to door asking for food in return for a prayer for the dead,” and they would carry “hollowed-out turnip lanterns, whose candle connoted a soul trapped in purgatory.” (Halloween​—From Pagan Ritual to Party Night) Others say that the lanterns were used to ward off evil spirits. During the 1800’s in North America, pumpkins replaced turnips because they were plentiful as well as easy to hollow out and carve. The beliefs behind this custom​—the immortality of the soul, purgatory, and prayers for the dead​—are not based on the Bible.​—Ezekiel 18:4.


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